Hong Kong film hopes to break new ground with 3D porn

Well, someone has to try to milk as much money from people before we got completely sick and tired of being robbed and with horribly made movies. Who can blame them for trying when they can charge so much more for movies with the “3D” regardless if it is any good in 3D?

The recent bunch of rubbish hollywood-made 3D films have certainly make me sick of watching them and don’t feel like paying the premium anymore.

And porn in 3D? Is it really that new? Don’t you get much better stuff in red-light districts already? With a vibrant and institutionalized prostitution (一樓一) industry in Hong Kong, is 3D porn really needed?

Hong Kong film hopes to break new ground with 3-D porn.

On the leafy fringes of Hong Kong in a shabby film studio, a nude ponytailed actor stretched out on animal-skins with his lover as the cameras rolled in a set evoking a subterranean sex lair in ancient China.

Turning away from a slightly blurred high definition TV screen as the actors writhed, director Christopher Sun shouted “cut” whilst yanking off his 3-D glasses. “Good” he yelled.

No ordinary porn flick, “3-D Sex & Zen: Extreme Ecstasy” is being touted as the world’s first IMAX-3-D erotic film.

3D film backlash starts, but porn could save the day – Cinema-goers don’t want to pay for mediocre 3D films. Someone should tell the porn film makers

Has the backlash against 3D films begun? A glut of mediocre 3D films flopping at the box office has raised fears that cinema-goers are no longer prepared to pay a premium to watch these movies – many of which weren’t actually filmed in 3D but were converted in post-production.

The success of Avatar, which was released at the end of 2009 and quickly went through the $1bn box office sales mark, led many to believe that a new age had dawned. People would be persuaded that it was worth making a trip to the cinema – at an inflated price – to see spectacular 3D films rather than waiting for them to be released on DVD. And all Hollywood studios had to do was add the tagline ‘3D’ to their movies.

Tim Burton quickly announced that his ‘re-imagining’ of Alice in Wonderland would be released in 3D, one of many movies that were converted to 3D in post-production, with mixed results. (Avatar was actually filmed in 3D with special cameras).

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